Food Bank Profiles

Featured staff profiles from our member food banks: 

Madi Corry: Programs Manager

Campus Food Bank (University of Alberta)

What was your dream job as a kid?

I wanted to be an author, specifically of children’s books or books for youth.

What led you into the food banking world?

The Campus Food Bank was the first volunteer opportunity that I discovered when I started university, so the organization became a big part of my daily life. As soon as I graduated, I joined the staff team and have been ever since.

How long have you been involved with the food bank?

I started volunteering at the CFB in 2012 and stayed on as a senior volunteer throughout my degree. Then in 2016, I became a staff member!

Who inspires you the most?

I’m inspired most by the volunteers that I get to work with at the CFB! They are all doing such exciting things in school and I love getting to see what they go on to after their time volunteering with our organization.

Describe one thing you have learned about food banking.

I’ve learned so much from visiting other food banks and seeing how they operate. All food banks are a little different, so I can always take some tip or new problem-solving idea from how each organization

What advice would you give to anyone wanting to work in a food bank?

I would say that food banks are a very rewarding and challenging place to work! Things are most often busy and there will always be new projects and opportunities to explore. I’ve found it very important to remember to direct my energy into what will best serve the clients and organization.


Elena Maltais: Warehouse Supervisor

Parkland Food Bank

What was your dream job as a kid?

Any job that involved using a typewriter or an adding machine. 

What led you into the food banking world?

I helped as a weekly volunteer then was hired on after a few years.

 

How long have you been involved with the food bank?

5 1/2 years.

Who inspires you the most?

All our volunteers. They come in ready to give 110% every time!

Describe one thing you have learned about food banking.

I learned that food banks across Canada are now becoming the resource for rescuing still-edible produce, dairy & meat from local stores which otherwise would have ended up in the trash.

What advice would you give to anyone wanting to work in a food bank?

Most food banks can benefit from volunteers with a variety of skills that might not pertain to their daily volunteer duties (i.e., organizational skills, accounting, gardening, electrical/plumbing, fundraising experience, painting & renos, etc.). Let your local food bank know what your area of expertise is because it’s always helpful not having to hire out for costly jobs.


Neil Heaton: Operations Manager 

Interfaith Food Bank Society of Lethbridge

What was your dream job as a kid?

Fireman.

What led you into the food banking world?

It started as a summer job, but turned into a very rewarding career.

How long have you been involved with the food bank?

20 years.

Who inspires you the most?

Our volunteers: their willingness to put numerous hours in to help our clients and expecting nothing in return. Also, any of our former clients who have had a “success story”. They inspire me to work hard every day so hopefully, in time, there are numerous more “success stories”.

Describe one thing you have learned about food banking.

Food banks can do so much with minimal resources.

What advice would you give to anyone wanting to work in a food bank?

Nonprofit work, especially food bank work, is a calling that isn’t for all people. But if you do become involved, the path is one of the most rewarding.